PMG's Featured Note of the Month: Maldives 1,000 Rufiyaa

Posted on 6/16/2020

In honor of the 50th anniversary of Maldivian independence, the Maldives Monetary Authority released a polymer banknote featuring ocean life that can be found in Maldivian waters.

Maldives, Monetary Authority, Pick# 31a, 2015 / AH1436, 1,000 Rufiyaa, front
Graded PMG 67 Superb Gem Uncirculated EPQ.
Click image to enlarge.

Maldives, Monetary Authority, Pick# 31a, 2015 / AH1436, 1,000 Rufiyaa, back
Graded PMG 67 Superb Gem Uncirculated EPQ.
Click image to enlarge.

Country: Maldives

Catalog Number: 31

Date: 2015

Denomination: 1,000 Rufiyaa

Varieties: There is currently only one variety of this banknote, plus a replacement version that is recognized by a “Z” prefix.

What makes it special? In 2015, the 50th anniversary of Maldivian independence, the Maldives Monetary Authority announced a series of polymer banknotes with the theme of “Maldives and the Maldivian People.” This particular note, with its ocean-blue color, was used to showcase the rare and fascinating species of ocean life that can be found in Maldivian waters. The front features a large sea turtle, with coral and manta rays visible in the background. The back shows a whale shark, a gentle giant that can be seen year-round in the South Ari Atoll of the Maldives.

Why is it interesting now? June’s Note of the Month is relevant for two reasons. First, World Oceans Day falls on June 8. This internationally recognized holiday was first established by the United Nations in 2008, and its purpose is to draw attention to conservation efforts for the world’s oceans and its resources. Coincidentally, June also happens to be National Zoo & Aquarium Month, as first proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1982. This lovely banknote, featuring some majestic creatures from the deep, seems the perfect choice to honor both occasions.

Did you know? Whale sharks are the largest-known existing species of fish, with the largest reaching around 40 feet in length. Luckily, though, they are filter feeders, meaning that they survive off plankton, krill and other tiny ocean lifeforms, much like baleen whales do. Oddly enough, whale sharks do actually have teeth (about 3,000 of them!), but they are tiny and researchers are uncertain of their purpose, since they are not used for eating.

Total graded by PMG: 107

PMG median grade: 66 EPQ

PMG highest graded: 68 EPQ

Sales highlights: These notes can be purchased for around $100 to $200.

PMG Registry Champion: This note is part of the Maldives Monetary Authority, 1983-Date, P9-Date, Complete set.

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