1928 Gold Certificates - High Denominations
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11 posts in this topic

Thought I'd share these pics. Back around 1998, I bought the 1,000 from Denly's, and the $500 off of Ebay.

 

Not too bad, and hard to find these days.

 

I figure I should submit them for grading, in the meantime any guesses as to grades from these scans?

867324-1928_gold.jpg.8a4cb81fd7d76bbaa22a931e2f25d56e.jpg

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The $500 looks like a VF with a horizontal crease. The $1000 appears too blurry to grade.

 

Funny story. I once handled a small size $500 gold note. I conservatively graded it CH AU back in 1998. It was an UNC with a horizontal handling crease and a small corner fold. There was also a handling smudge. A great note. At the time I got a bit over CU greensheet($3300) for it even though it was AU, but the spread was only $800. I saw the same note again at the Chicago 1999 ANA summer show. The note had been pressed to remove the crease, the corner fold had been "fixed", and the smudge was gone. I know it was the same note from the serial number. The "new" Gem CU asking price was now $9000. You could see the crease, but only by handling it. These are the notes that are going into slabs now. Only time will tell when the doctoring starts to darken the note, or ,for that matter, any note.

 

 

TRUTH

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I guess if one wants to doctor notes, it is a calculated risk. They can destroy one and lose out, or maybe "enhance" a note.

 

I am basically "neutral" on this theme...if "messing" with a note improves a note and no one can tell, it seems to me it is the same as someone who "messed" with it a day after it went into circulation.

 

If a note was "improved" 1 day after circulation or 50 years later, should there be a difference if no one can tell? See my point?

 

Just a thought.

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I guess if one wants to doctor notes, it is a calculated risk. They can destroy one and lose out, or maybe "enhance" a note.

 

I am basically "neutral" on this theme...if "messing" with a note improves a note and no one can tell, it seems to me it is the same as someone who "messed" with it a day after it went into circulation.

 

If a note was "improved" 1 day after circulation or 50 years later, should there be a difference if no one can tell? See my point?

 

Just a thought.

 

 

I understand. In the coin trade, many doctored coins do not begin to "turn" for several months, thus the end user is the loser and is "stuck" with an alterned coin. WIth notes, I know that many tears can be doctored to appear like new. However, over time, the tear adhesive begins to turn dark, making the note worth less than with a tear. I guess if the doctoring is non invasive, then you have a point.

 

 

TRUTH

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I would say today's standards the notes would be VF! They are super notes to own i wish I had put up a pair!!! foreheadslap.gif

 

As far as pressed notes go you can tell. I have a couple of Inova lights. You usually just need to get the right amount of light on the note and you can see the fold. There are some good posts on how to tell the difference from a pressed note to one that hasn't been messed with across the street.

Plugged holes and repairs pop out with the ultraviolet!

 

 

 

 

Edited by BankNote1
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