I have a situation and I need help. Please?
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I'm new to note collecting. Not new enough to be considered green, but growing up with a decent coin collection and a sprawling stamp collection, I knew enough about numismatics to know that there's a system to grading. I have a certain tack in mind when I buy and I'm sure I'm not the only person who implements this: I look for ungraded notes that, when graded, will produce a piece a little more valuable than what I paid for it. Hey, it makes me feel better, since I don't have money falling out of my .

So, I buy this note off of a dealer, ungraded, and I congratulate myself, because the price is right and I can't even find a crease - let alone a fold - in the photo of this 1899 series $1 bill. When I got it in the mail, I couldn't believe the condition of it. It looked like it'd been sitting in a bank vault for a hundred years. I thought, for a minute, that I just bought a fake, but then my nose said it smelled just like money. Amazing, it had the same bewitching smell back then that it has today. And, it was the same bill from the picture in the add: just the tiniest of tiny folds right in the corner, that's it.

Imagine my chagrin when it only pulled back a measly 30 on the PMG richter scale. I'm, like, no flippin' way. I just got back a 1917 series $1 bill from them, with the same score, that was way more beat up: three major folds and even seemed crinkled a bit. I called them up to talk to someone. I needed more information; I didn't want to accept the grade that I'd gotten. When I was told that it's looked at by three different people (in a place called the quiet room), well, what more could I say after hearing this? I thanked him for his time and ended the conversation, more confused than ever. I feel so strongly about this that it's two months later and I'm writing about my experience in this forum. I thought about doing a crossover grading with PCGS, letting them take a look at it.

I've photographed both items, since the submission index search is currently down. Will someone please advise me? Each photo's name is its PMG reference number, in case you want to take the time to view their photo of it. They're definately better than mine. Thank you very much for your help and your time and stay safe!

Kind regards, Martin C. from San Francisco, California

 
 
 
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8071157-001[1].jpg

8078093-001[1].jpg

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The bill looks like it may have been flattened. Why did it not receive EPQ they sometimes list it on the back of the label?

30 seems a little low for that note but without seeing both sides and the note in hand it's impossible to be certain. I will say base on the images of the front, the note appears to be no higher than AU.

 

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34 minutes ago, mrcoolangelo said:

Thanks, Mike. Will post a copy of the back as soon as I get off of work. The PMG reference number is 8078093-001.

I looked up the note using the cert #. 

What I'm seeing is 3 potential folds running vertically (if not folds then heavy creasing), the front upper right corner appears to have been dog eared, edges/corners aren't great, there is missing ink in spots and possible surface tears, lots of soiling, foxing, shadowing and it looks like there is some yellow substance or yellowing on the back. Makes me wonder if it wasn't previously mounted in an album or something. Sorry, I'm not trying to run down the note but that's what I'm seeing. 30 seems a little heavy handed, based on the pictures I would have guessed 40 - 50, but having the note in hand makes a huge difference. PMG is the best TPG out there (IMO) and I'm going to say they got it right.

Sometimes they keep graders notes for bills, you could ask. Other options would be to send it in to PMG for ReGrade or to PCGS Currency but I feel like you'd be wasting your time and money doing so. 

Your post reminds me of a question that comes up from time to time, should TPG's add graders notes to submissions either automatically or by request (for a fee). It would absolutely be nice but TPG's probably don't have the time and can't eat the lost revenue, since by the time a grader jotted down a quick explanation they could have graded an additional note or two. 

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Hey, it looks good for a 121 year old piece of paper / cloth! That said, I'm with Mike in that I don't think I'd throwing more money at it is going to bring you much joy here. Enjoy it for what it is I say.

Valuewise how do you make out on a 30, after grading fees?

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Thank you both for your time and your insight here. You're right, it does look pretty good for a 121-year-old piece of paper and I'm just thankful I was lucky enough to have crossed paths with it.

See you guys around the forums and stay safe out there.

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I recently came across a mention of this in a text on literature. By the way, I often find answers to these questions in scientific works. I was looking for this information because I had to write a research paper. So I searched for it through reviews of the best research paper writing services. I read them on papersbattle.com and chose. But among the used letter I came across one of the copies of the description of such and similar banknotes. I hope to publish my research work and be useful to someone.

 

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