am fairly new to collecting currency
0

8 posts in this topic

4 posts

I am fairly new to collecting currency. I see alot of graded notes that have a "Net Grading" after the number. Should i stay away from purchasing these style of notes? Do collectors look down on Net Graded notes? Does it detract from their value?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 posts

If you have no other way of obtaining the issue to fill a hole in your collection or the item is otherwise attractive then go for it. Don't forget that for foreign notes in particular, what is regarded as a NET grade may be fairly standard way that notes of that type may be encountered.

 

Don't let anyone else tell you what you should or should not collect!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
150 posts

As far as I can see pedigrees add very little unless they are higher grade, the collector was known for substantial collections and other conditions are met. Just look up in auction archives what your graded note may be worth based on what similar graded notes sold for. 1928 $100 golds have demand in higher grades VF and above. I know Scott Lindquist is always a buyer of those.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 posts

Net after the grade means that the note has been altered in some way, such as mounted, repaired or has a foreign substance. These note are slightly less desirable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
240 posts

A "NET" grade lets you know there is a problem with the note.

 

It could be something fairly obvious, like a rust stain or tear, or it could be something you would not be able to detect without very close inspection like "repaired" or "foreign substance". Typically the rarer the note, the less affect a NET grade has on the value. If you are collecting popular, iconic notes that are not rare, than I would advise against procuring notes with NET grades. Buy the note, not the holder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 posts

Yes, I agree with Steve above, buy the note, not the holder.

 

I personally only purchase net notes if they are very rare (some of the early FRN stars), or very expensive (1928C, D, and E $1 stars).

 

Best of luck in the hobby, and may many awesome finds come your way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 posts

Well, though this post was started a while back, I see this has somehow brought back... lol, which happens some times, for the lucky posts like this to be 'RESURRECTED' by someone.

 

Well, as a currency collector who focus more on UNC notes only, well, for the time being, as people above me said, my advise to you is that, do some research. Go to the auction sites like E-bay, E-bid or what have you, and various dealer sites, and compare. If the note in question is of a rarity, that you can't get otherwise, I say go for it. It WILL be worth something in a long run. Otherwise, well... it's up to you.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 posts

In my experience collecting and trading in world notes, I would say that if a note is the only one of its Pick type graded - or less than five - and has been NET graded the I would assume that it would make very little to no difference.

 

In Germany the terminology for such ''unique'' notes in certain catalogs is ''LP''. ''LP'' means Liebhaberpreis or - direct translation - Afficionado price. The cost would generally be a high one, far above similar (priced) ones for that denomination. Both NET and non-NET graded notes would or should cause a bidding war in a well-publicized auction situtation.

 

For 99%+ of modern, let us say post 1970 notes, the note would probably not be collectable EXCEPT in case of pin holes/ spindle holes with French, French colonies & dominions, India & Indian sub-continent issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0