A "Stonewall Jackson" 1864 $500 Confederate note
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1864Confed500_zps8d428add.jpg

 

I became interested in this note after I acquired a nice example of the 1863 Stonewall Jackson medal that was made in France. This was the second $500 note that the Confederacy issued, but in this case it was met for circulation, and it did not bear interest. In reality the Confederacy was headed toward its last legs. This note, which was issued starting in February 1864 was a reflection of that desperation. Despite its high face value, it had no back printing, while the $5, $10, $20 and $50 notes all had backs.

 

This note comes in various shades of red and pink. For the early notes, with serial numbers up to 6000 the notes were bright red or something close. Then the printers realized that they were running short on red ink, and they diluted it. At one point the printers ran out of red ink entirely, and a very small number of notes had only the black printing. These notes were returned to be fixed when a new supply of red ink became available. The note shown here is a bit darker than some pieces, but it still not an example of the full red printing which does bring a premium price.

 

These notes are actually fairly common, but they are very popular with collectors because the Stonewall Jackson portrait. As a result they bring strong prices relative to their rarity. When I went looking for an example of this note there were no certified pieces available at the summer Baltimore and FUN shows although there was a fair number of raw pieces for sale.

 

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Interesting narrative and a very interesting and desirable note. I am looking to increase the amount of confederate notes that I own but I think a bill such as that one would be way out of my range.

 

Thanks for sharing that info and the note.

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1864Confed500_zps8d428add.jpg

 

I became interested in this note after I acquired a nice example of the 1863 Stonewall Jackson medal that was made in France. This was the second $500 note that the Confederacy issued, but in this case it was met for circulation, and it did not bear interest. In reality the Confederacy was headed toward its last legs. This note, which was issued starting in February 1864 was a reflection of that desperation. Despite its high face value, it had no back printing, while the $5, $10, $20 and $50 notes all had backs.

 

This note comes in various shades of red and pink. For the early notes, with serial numbers up to 6000 the notes were bright red or something close. Then the printers realized that they were running short on red ink, and they diluted it. At one point the printers ran out of red ink entirely, and a very small number of notes had only the black printing. These notes were returned to be fixed when a new supply of red ink became available. The note shown here is a bit darker than some pieces, but it still not an example of the full red printing which does bring a premium price.

 

These notes are actually fairly common, but they are very popular with collectors because the Stonewall Jackson portrait. As a result they bring strong prices relative to their rarity. When I went looking for an example of this note there were no certified pieces available at the summer Baltimore and FUN shows although there was a fair number of raw pieces for sale.

The reason the back is blank is because all the back plates for the 1864 series were captured, and the back plates used on the 5-100 were replacements that were quickly manufactured. Back in the 1970 and 1980's there was an outfit selling reprints of the original backs that were to be used, but I havn't seen any of these in years.

wheat

Edited by wheat'swheats
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The mark on the top right, looks like an interest paid stamp, although I don't think these notes were interest bearing -- perhaps someone can address that. I like the Confederate notes that paid interest, and have the interest paid stamps applied to them -- typically on the back of them as to me it adds authenticity and is just cool.

 

 

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It is not an interest stamp, it is a treasury stamp. There was one stamp per sheet of notes(1864). The ideal location was at the corner of the top 4 notes. However these were put on by hand and every once in a while you could find a note with a near complete stamp.

wheat

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Thank you so much for posting that about the 500 dollar bill. I have one and I haven't been able to find out anything about it. I took it to a coin dealer here in Baton Rouge he kept it for months and didn't find out anything.

Mine is lighter pink and the serial # is in the low 9000's.

 

I also have a 100 bill from 1862

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Thank you so much for posting that about the 500 dollar bill. I have one and I haven't been able to find out anything about it. I took it to a coin dealer here in Baton Rouge he kept it for months and didn't find out anything.

Mine is lighter pink and the serial # is in the low 9000's.

 

I also have a 100 bill from 1862

If you took that note to a dealer and he took months rather than minutes to tell you about the note , you need to find a new dealer. The note was printed under authorization of February 17 1864 which authorized $200,000,000 in all denominations. However probably 10 times that amount was actually issued and even more printed. The Jackson note type 64 (Criswell number) came in two shades of red. A dark red #489a and the more common salmon pink #489. The popularity of this note in mostly because only 2 types of $500 was issued and that Gen. Jackson was on the note. This note had a blank back because the plates were seized by blockade ships before they could be delivered from England to Keating and Ball in Columbia Sc. A much plainer reverse was hastily made for some of the 1864 notes but there was not enough time to make them for all. Thus the $500,$1 and $2 dollar notes have blank backs. I hope that helps

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Thanks for the info. I didn't know anybody else I the Baton Rouge area to take it to. The back on mine is blank. Does know anywhere in my area that could tell me anything?

what do you need to know? Just ask

 

Things like how much is it worth and if I wanted to sell it how would I go about it.

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Thanks for the info. I didn't know anybody else I the Baton Rouge area to take it to. The back on mine is blank. Does know anywhere in my area that could tell me anything?

what do you need to know? Just ask

 

Things like how much is it worth and if I wanted to sell it how would I go about it.

send me a pm and we can discuss what you have and about what it is worth. will be glad to assist. A photo with the message would help tremendiously

Edited by wheat'swheats
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Thanks for the info. I didn't know anybody else I the Baton Rouge area to take it to. The back on mine is blank. Does know anywhere in my area that could tell me anything?

what do you need to know? Just ask

 

Things like how much is it worth and if I wanted to sell it how would I go about it.

send me a pm and we can discuss what you have and about what it is worth. will be glad to assist. A photo with the message would help tremendiously

 

Ok thanks I didn't get to take the pictures today had a broken heater to fix. I'll take some tomorrow and PM you.

Thanks

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