Note by Gem - General Philip Sheridan
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Although of diminutive stature (5'5 115 lbs) General Philip Sheridan was one of the Civil War's most famed Generals. He's best known for his campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley especially the Battle of Cedar Creek.

 

During the Civil War, Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley was a vital resource to the Confederacy. Not only did it serve as the Confederate “breadbasket”, it was an important transportation route.

The region had witnessed two large-scale campaigns already when Gen. Ulysses S. Grant decided to visit the Valley once again in 1864. He sent Philip Sheridan on a mission to make the Shenandoah Valley a “barren waste”.

 

In September, Sheridan defeated Confederate General Jubal Early’s smaller force at Third Winchester, and again at Fisher’s Hill.

Then he began “The Burning” – destroying barns, mills, railroads, factories – destroying resources for which the Confederacy had a dire need.

 

In October, however,General Jubal Early, in what appeared to be a twist of fate, caught the Union Army off guard. Early launched a surprise attack at Cedar Creek on the Oct. 19th 1864.

The resulting attack left the Union Army in chaos. During the morning fighting, seven Union infantry divisions were forced to fall back. To make matters worse, Sheridan was twenty miles away in Winchester, Virginia.

Upon hearing the sound of artillery fire, Sheridan, jumped on his horse in a race to rejoin his forces. By mid day Early took a moment to regroup and consolidate his victory. Then came riding in Sheridan rallying the faltering

Union force and by late afternoon Early and the Confederate Army had been routed.

 

For his actions at Cedar Creek, Sheridan was promoted to Major General. He also received a letter of gratitude from President Abraham Lincoln. The general took great pleasure in Thomas Buchanan Read’s poem, “Sheridan’s Ride” – so much so that he renamed his horse “Winchester”.

 

The Federal victory ended Jubal Early’s career, lifted the pall of war-weariness from the North, helped assure the reelection of Lincoln and ended Southern hopes for a negotiated settlement of the War.

 

Sheridan's Ride

by Thomas Buchanan Read (1822-1872)

 

Up from the South, at break of day,

Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay,

The affrighted air with a shudder bore,

Like a herald in haste to the chieftain's door,

The terrible grumble, and rumble, and roar,

Telling the battle was on once more,

And Sheridan twenty miles away.

 

And wider still those billows of war

Thundered along the horizon's bar;

And louder yet into Winchester rolled

The roar of that red sea uncontrolled,

Making the blood of the listener cold,

As he thought of the stake in that fiery fray,

With Sheridan twenty miles away.

 

But there is a road from Winchester town,

A good, broad highway leading down:

And there, through the flush of the morning light,

A steed as black as the steeds of night

Was seen to pass, as with eagle flight;

As if he knew the terrible need,

He stretched away with his utmost speed.

Hills rose and fell, but his heart was gay,

With Sheridan fifteen miles away.

 

Still sprang from those swift hoofs, thundering south,

The dust like smoke from the cannon's mouth,

Or the trail of a comet, sweeping faster and faster,

Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster.

The heart of the steed and the heart of the master

Were beating like prisoners assaulting their walls,

Impatient to be where the battle-field calls;

Every nerve of the charger was strained to full play,

With Sheridan only ten miles away.

 

Under his spurning feet, the road

Like an arrowy Alpine river flowed,

And the landscape sped away behind

Like an ocean flying before the wind;

And the steed, like a barque fed with furnace ire,

Swept on, with his wild eye full of fire;

But, lo! he is nearing his heart's desire;

He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray,

With Sheridan only five miles away.

 

The first that the general saw were the groups

Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops;

What was to be done? what to do?--a glance told him both.

Then striking his spurs with a terrible oath,

He dashed down the line, 'mid a storm of huzzas,

And the wave of retreat checked its course there, because

The sight of the master compelled it to pause.

With foam and with dust the black charger was gray;

By the flash of his eye, and his red nostril's play,

He seemed to the whole great army to say:

"I have brought you Sheridan all the way

From Winchester down to save the day."

 

Hurrah! hurrah for Sheridan!

Hurrah! hurrah for horse and man!

And when their statues are placed on high

Under the dome of the Union sky,

The American soldier's Temple of Fame,

There, with the glorious general's name,

Be it said, in letters both bold and bright:

"Here is the steed that saved the day

By carrying Sheridan into the fight,

From Winchester--twenty miles away!"

 

 

fr369_zpsa18bdaba.png

 

fr369r_zps2e0b014b.png

 

Painting Depicting Sherdan's Ride

 

sheridanhorse_zps48bf6dbb.jpg

Edited by GEM
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Although of diminutive stature (5'5 115 lbs) General Philip Sheridan was one of the Civil War's most famed Generals. He's best known for his campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley especially the Battle of Cedar Creek.

 

During the Civil War, Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley was a vital resource to the Confederacy. Not only did it serve as the Confederate “breadbasket”, it was an important transportation route.

The region had witnessed two large-scale campaigns already when Gen. Ulysses S. Grant decided to visit the Valley once again in 1864. He sent Philip Sheridan on a mission to make the Shenandoah Valley a “barren waste”.

 

In September, Sheridan defeated Confederate General Jubal Early’s smaller force at Third Winchester, and again at Fisher’s Hill.

Then he began “The Burning” – destroying barns, mills, railroads, factories – destroying resources for which the Confederacy had a dire need.

 

In October, however,General Jubal Early, in what appeared to be a twist of fate, caught the Union Army off guard. Early launched a surprise attack at Cedar Creek on the Oct. 19th 1864.

The resulting attack left the Union Army in chaos. During the morning fighting, seven Union infantry divisions were forced to fall back. To make matters worse, Sheridan was twenty miles away in Winchester, Virginia.

Upon hearing the sound of artillery fire, Sheridan, jumped on his horse in a race to rejoin his forces. By mid day Early took a moment to regroup and consolidate his victory. Then came riding in Sheridan rallying the faltering

Union force and by late afternoon Early and the Confederate Army had been routed.

 

For his actions at Cedar Creek, Sheridan was promoted to Major General. He also received a letter of gratitude from President Abraham Lincoln. The general took great pleasure in Thomas Buchanan Read’s poem, “Sheridan’s Ride” – so much so that he renamed his horse “Winchester”.

 

The Federal victory ended Jubal Early’s career, lifted the pall of war-weariness from the North, helped assure the reelection of Lincoln and ended Southern hopes for a negotiated settlement of the War.

 

Sheridan's Ride

by Thomas Buchanan Read (1822-1872)

 

Up from the South, at break of day,

Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay,

The affrighted air with a shudder bore,

Like a herald in haste to the chieftain's door,

The terrible grumble, and rumble, and roar,

Telling the battle was on once more,

And Sheridan twenty miles away.

 

And wider still those billows of war

Thundered along the horizon's bar;

And louder yet into Winchester rolled

The roar of that red sea uncontrolled,

Making the blood of the listener cold,

As he thought of the stake in that fiery fray,

With Sheridan twenty miles away.

 

But there is a road from Winchester town,

A good, broad highway leading down:

And there, through the flush of the morning light,

A steed as black as the steeds of night

Was seen to pass, as with eagle flight;

As if he knew the terrible need,

He stretched away with his utmost speed.

Hills rose and fell, but his heart was gay,

With Sheridan fifteen miles away.

 

Still sprang from those swift hoofs, thundering south,

The dust like smoke from the cannon's mouth,

Or the trail of a comet, sweeping faster and faster,

Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster.

The heart of the steed and the heart of the master

Were beating like prisoners assaulting their walls,

Impatient to be where the battle-field calls;

Every nerve of the charger was strained to full play,

With Sheridan only ten miles away.

 

Under his spurning feet, the road

Like an arrowy Alpine river flowed,

And the landscape sped away behind

Like an ocean flying before the wind;

And the steed, like a barque fed with furnace ire,

Swept on, with his wild eye full of fire;

But, lo! he is nearing his heart's desire;

He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray,

With Sheridan only five miles away.

 

The first that the general saw were the groups

Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops;

What was to be done? what to do?--a glance told him both.

Then striking his spurs with a terrible oath,

He dashed down the line, 'mid a storm of huzzas,

And the wave of retreat checked its course there, because

The sight of the master compelled it to pause.

With foam and with dust the black charger was gray;

By the flash of his eye, and his red nostril's play,

He seemed to the whole great army to say:

"I have brought you Sheridan all the way

From Winchester down to save the day."

 

Hurrah! hurrah for Sheridan!

Hurrah! hurrah for horse and man!

And when their statues are placed on high

Under the dome of the Union sky,

The American soldier's Temple of Fame,

There, with the glorious general's name,

Be it said, in letters both bold and bright:

"Here is the steed that saved the day

By carrying Sheridan into the fight,

From Winchester--twenty miles away!"

 

 

fr369_zpsa18bdaba.png

 

fr369r_zps2e0b014b.png

 

Painting Depicting Sherdan's Ride

 

sheridanhorse_zps48bf6dbb.jpg

very nice note but I'll take stewart

wheat

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