Thoughts on Small Size Market
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16 posts in this topic

Curious as to your thoughts on the small size market.

Do you see it as growing?

 

Do you feel that prices of 64/65 graded material is fairly valued or even represents a bargain at this time?

 

Any particular issues you see as better than others to collect at this time (ie silvers, golds, legals, etc.).

 

Do you think that what block a note came from really matters?

 

Do you believe that small size notes will one day have the desirability that large size notes have?

 

 

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Hello,

 

No, I do not think the small size market will ever get to the point where it is on par with the large size market. It is like comparing apples to oranges. When I show someone who is a non-collector, a large size note, I get a much different response then when I show them a small size note. Look at the beauty of an educational note and find a small size comparison. You cannot.

 

That being said, as soon as the current economic downturn is over, I do expect the market to heat up again. I do not expect the same kind of growth we saw in the last ten years though, as I believe that was mainly due to third party grading.

 

Large size notes will always be in a league of their own. That being said, collect what you like. There are some small size notes that carry incredible premiums. Large size notes just get all the attention in some cases.

 

 

Edited by mintcollector
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I'll take a $10,000 small size note over a large size Martha Washington note all day long.

 

I would to, but the original poster asked about notes in 64/65 condition. How many $10,000 notes are left in this condition, and how much do they cost? Compare a Martha note (as you state in your example) with any comparably priced small size note, and I assure you people would be impressed with the large size note, if only for the uniqueness of the item in question.

 

Good point, though...

Edited by mintcollector
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I'll take a $10,000 small size note over a large size Martha Washington note all day long.

 

I would to, but the original poster asked about notes in 64/65 condition. How many $10,000 notes are left in this condition, and how much do they cost? Compare a Martha note (as you state in your example) with any comparably priced small size note, and I assure you people would be impressed with the large size note, if only for the uniqueness of the item in question.

 

Good point, though...

 

I was attempting to add a bit of humor.

 

Personally, I think the 1899 Chief and 1901 Bison are of fantastic design, and I like them better than the Educationals. A really neat note with a very interesting history is the 1900 $10,000. I am happy to own all three of these, and I encourage those new to the hobby to view high grade examples "in hand" if given the opportunity. With respect to small size notes, my preference is for the 1928 gold certificates -- the higher the denomination the better!

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Thanks for the replies. I agree about the "wow" factor on large size (after all, bigger is better). I'm more interested in your thoughts on the market for collecting small size market.

 

Do you think 64/65 material is fairly priced now, or does it represent a bargain?

 

In large size (which I currently collect), we generally don't have the issue of what block something came from impacting the value. Does it really matter?

 

My son is almost 11. He started at age 7 with common foreign and us coins. He traded those to get some better ones. He sold those to buy foreign paper money that he thought looked cool. He traded and sold that to the point where he has now focusing on older Philippines, Mexico and Brazil. He's got the eye for American Bank Note stuff. He likes the engravings and the fact that it looks like American money. When we go to shows dealers are blown away by a kid his age collecting paper money, that is not in the junk boxes.

 

Anyway, I can see "the wheels turning," and he has his eye on "funnybacks," and red seals. So, I am considering purchasing for him for the future (to give as gifts for his enjoyment but with an investment potential), 64/65 PMG red seals, blue seals, and WWII stuff.

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Thanks for the replies. I agree about the "wow" factor on large size (after all, bigger is better). I'm more interested in your thoughts on the market for collecting small size market.

 

Do you think 64/65 material is fairly priced now, or does it represent a bargain?

 

In large size (which I currently collect), we generally don't have the issue of what block something came from impacting the value. Does it really matter?

 

My son is almost 11. He started at age 7 with common foreign and us coins. He traded those to get some better ones. He sold those to buy foreign paper money that he thought looked cool. He traded and sold that to the point where he has now focusing on older Philippines, Mexico and Brazil. He's got the eye for American Bank Note stuff. He likes the engravings and the fact that it looks like American money. When we go to shows dealers are blown away by a kid his age collecting paper money, that is not in the junk boxes.

 

Anyway, I can see "the wheels turning," and he has his eye on "funnybacks," and red seals.

So, I am considering purchasing for him for the future (to give as gifts for his enjoyment but with an investment potential), 64/65 PMG red seals, blue seals, and WWII stuff.

 

 

What is your price range? This is the most important question of all.

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I'll take a $10,000 small size note over a large size Martha Washington note all day long.

 

I would to, but the original poster asked about notes in 64/65 condition. How many $10,000 notes are left in this condition, and how much do they cost? Compare a Martha note (as you state in your example) with any comparably priced small size note, and I assure you people would be impressed with the large size note, if only for the uniqueness of the item in question.

 

Good point, though...

 

I was attempting to add a bit of humor.

 

Personally, I think the 1899 Chief and 1901 Bison are of fantastic design, and I like them better than the Educationals. A really neat note with a very interesting history is the 1900 $10,000. I am happy to own all three of these, and I encourage those new to the hobby to view high grade examples "in hand" if given the opportunity. With respect to small size notes, my preference is for the 1928 gold certificates -- the higher the denomination the better!

 

 

It is all good. I personally collect US currency from 1935 and earlier.

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My son is in the up to $30 range. I don't mind spending up to a couple hundred per note for 65 PMG.

 

Depends on what you buy. The 1929 FRN series are a good buy right now, in my opinion. I am sure your son is building a nice collection, for his price range. It is nice that young people are involved in collecting currency.

Edited by mintcollector
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Have you considered Fractionals? When I tell people these substituted coins after the civil war for a period of time, they're astonished. Plus the designs are really cool.

 

 

oooo - my 500th post! :ohnoez:

Edited by kbsig106
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Thanks for the suggestions. I think some of the fractionals are nice and really not much different in price than the small size. I guess I was thinking that fractionals really haven't moved in value, and that perhaps the red seals and special issues might represent a better value or investment opportunity. Now that I think of those fractionals, the Chicago Columbian Exposition tickets look a lot like them and might be really cool for my son as well.

 

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If you want to stay in the small size series let me suggest the $5 red seals. A complete set in high grade can be assembled for an "affordable" price.

 

Another interesting set (though somewhat pricey in high grade) is the R and S silver certificates.

 

The above would be my suggestions for potential price appreciation in high grade, but just my opinion.

 

 

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My son is in the up to $30 range. I don't mind spending up to a couple hundred per note for 65 PMG.

 

Depends on what you buy. The 1929 FRN series are a good buy right now, in my opinion. I am sure your son is building a nice collection, for his price range. It is nice that young people are involved in collecting currency.

 

A variation on this would be the 1929 FRN star (*) notes. The prices are crazy in high grades, but not too bad in the lower grades. A bargain given their rarity in my opinion. Of course I am biased since I am accumulating these myself and think they are under appreciated.

 

I agree that the non-star notes are also a good buy and can be purchased in high grades often at what I consider "no-brainer" prices.

 

 

 

 

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"Do you think that what block a note came from really matters?"

 

Yes, the block absolutely does matter, particularly for $1 notes since they have so many blocks. For example, look at the Hawaii Emergency notes and you will find there are nine blocks (including the *- A) with a big difference in price because some blocks are common while other blocks are tougher to find in high grade. With some blocks being common and some blocks being scarce there can be a price difference by a factor of 4 or 5.

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