Currency Printing Corrections
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Can anyone tell me if they have ever found if the US Mint has published or made available the data for currency destroyed? What I am looking for is records from the mint on currency that has been returned to them that is no longer usable and they destroyed it, thus reducing the number printed. This way you could adjust the number of notes out there. For example, FR#2400, $10 Gold Cert. from 1928 has over 130M printed. I'm just wondering how many were returned or destroyed by the mint, maybe reducing that number.

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The BEP would not have the information, either. They only make the stuff. Once it is out of their hands, they no longer track it. The Treasury Department may have some records or the Federal Reserve.

 

The raw information may be available for certain types of notes (Nationals, Gold Certificates, etc.) First, you would have to find it. (Hint: It is either at the Treasury in DC or the National Archives in College Park, MD, or both, but most likely in College Park). Then you would have to sort through the raw reports to accumulate the data.

 

Send a Freedom of Information Act request to the Treasury asking for the information you are looking for. I sent one in 2007 to the Bureau of Public Debt regarding the redemption of war bonds. It only took them two months to respond and they gave me most of the information I was looking for.

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The most accurate way of determining how many of the 1928 $10 gold certificates were destroyed would be to search census data for the number of notes known to exist. Subtract that from the number originally printed, and you will see that over 99% were destroyed. (It would have been 100% if the BEP had its way).

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The most accurate way of determining how many of the 1928 $10 gold certificates were destroyed would be to search census data for the number of notes known to exist. Subtract that from the number originally printed, and you will see that over 99% were destroyed. (It would have been 100% if the BEP had its way).

 

What census are you referring to?

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Virtually any census that contains 1928 $10 Gold Certificates.... I believe that Track and Price is one that does (I could be wrong about that), but if a person was informed as to why the gold certificates were removed from circulation, the consequences for not redeeming them, and what they were replaced by, it would become clear that even a 99% redemption is far too low, unless that same person actually feels that there are more than 1.3 million of these notes still outstanding.

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Virtually any census that contains 1928 $10 Gold Certificates.... I believe that Track and Price is one that does (I could be wrong about that), but if a person was informed as to why the gold certificates were removed from circulation, the consequences for not redeeming them, and what they were replaced by, it would become clear that even a 99% redemption is far too low, unless that same person actually feels that there are more than 1.3 million of these notes still outstanding.

 

This would not be correct. This is because the majority of notes available on the marketplace are NOT certified. Not everyone slabs their notes, and it is estimated that less than ten to twenty percent of all high grade items are certified.

 

Therefore if you are using an analysis with census of graded notes only; you are not getting an accurate figure.

 

Though I don't know if Track and Price gives raw census estimates?

Edited by mintcollector
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I hardly consider TPG grading populations as censuses...... the vast majority of notes in any serious census are comprised of serial numbers, very, very few of them TPG graded.

 

Track and Price gives census numbers of all known notes...... TPG graded or not... if were otherwise, a census would be totally worthless.

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I hardly consider TPG grading populations as censuses...... the vast majority of notes in any serious census are comprised of serial numbers, very, very few of them TPG graded.

 

Track and Price gives census numbers of all known notes...... TPG graded or not... if were otherwise, a census would be totally worthless.

 

Thank you, as I have never used Track and Price. The only census information I know of is completely inaccurate and skewed...as it is the TPG market reports.

 

 

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