Which guide to go by for prices?
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Ok I'm a little confused. I just started really getting serious collecting paper currency. I have purchased "The Guide Book of United States Paper Money" 2nd Edition by Arthur and Ira Friedberg, "Paper Money of the United States" 19th edition, same authors, and Coin Dealer Newsletter GreenSheet. Now for example, an 1899 $1 Silver Certificate F-236 Grade VF-20 has many different prices. In the "Guide Book", its listed at $325, in the "Paper Money" its listed at $235, and in the GreenSheet, its listed at a bid $170/ask $185. Of course the GreenSheet will be wholesale, whats the others? Retail? Why such a huge difference from the same authors? There is only a 1 year difference, and from what I have been reading over the last few months large size notes have been increasing and this is a "Bread and Butter" note, very collected, very marketable. So which prices should be good? Also, has anyone looked at the David Q. Bowers "Whitman Encyclopedia of U.S. Paper Money?" What is your thoughts on this book if it is a necessity to add to my library.

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i agree, these books/references are not consistant in prices.

i think it really depends on what collectors are willing to pay/sell.

 

my reference has been the Coin World U.S. Paper Money Values.

prices are usually updated monthly. but some of the rare notes are lower

than what you will actually pay. that is if you can find one to buy.

 

Coin World U.S. Paper Money Values.

http://www.coinworld.com/

http://editions.amospublishing.com/PMON/Default.aspx?d=20101004&pagenum=1&f=1

 

i also have the "Paper Money of the United States" 19th edition

these prices are not always correct with market value.

but its a good book to have for reference.

 

- Track and Price maybe the best way to determine current market value.

they will allow you a Free 30-Day Trial Version

http://www.trackandprice.com/buycurr.php

 

i think it all comes down to supply/demand

prices should be based on what collectors are willing to pay.

not what the dealer wants to sell a note for.

 

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For hardcopy, Greensheet is the most accurate, but it's still very flawed as it doesn't give you values for variations and different signature combinations of a type.

 

Get Track & Price software. You'll be able to get a very precise idea of current market prices for all small and large size currency. T&P provides auction history for every Friedberg number and at all grades going back to the 1990s. It's updated about every 3 months with the most recent auction results - most recently in September 2010.

 

http://www.trackandprice.com/

 

Good luck.

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I agree that the greensheet is a good resource and that it does not list the different Friedberg numbers.

 

I like to compare any note I am buying to the Heritage Auction archives. It's free to join and you get the prices paid from the most recent auction to a decade (or more) ago.

 

Got o HA.com and sign up.

 

Try the Heritage site for awhile and then, if you want to delve in further, pay for the Track and Price.

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I agree that the greensheet is a good resource and that it does not list the different Friedberg numbers.

 

I like to compare any note I am buying to the Heritage Auction archives. It's free to join and you get the prices paid from the most recent auction to a decade (or more) ago.

 

Got o HA.com and sign up.

 

Try the Heritage site for awhile and then, if you want to delve in further, pay for the Track and Price.

 

 

I second that HA has good historical numbers and gives you a good cross reference on market prices. Just take in to account a good majority of the numbers have the buyers premium factored in.

 

I also use Coinworld as well.

 

 

 

 

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As a rule, forget the values published in "guide books" that come out infrequently. Values are typically inflated, and I don't know why they are even published.

 

I suggest the Bank Note Reporter which usually has ads listing buy/sell prices on many currency types. That is the real test of values, when dealers publish what they are willing to buy and sell notes for.

 

It's also a pretty good publication in my opinion.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

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I just ordered US Paper Values. They no longer print it by itself, it is now printed combined with Coin World. You can get the copies online as part of your subscription, along with archived price guides which is good for research.

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I just ordered US Paper Values. They no longer print it by itself, it is now printed combined with Coin World. You can get the copies online as part of your subscription, along with archived price guides which is good for research.

 

After I got my first combined edition of Coin World w/ paper money articles a little while ago - I was wondering what happened to the US Paper Values that came out about every two months. A bonus getting Coin World on the combined mag and a negative having to go on-line for the paper money price guide. I'll call it a wash...

 

 

 

 

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It would be nice if they included a pull out section with the prices printed so you had that as a hard copy. Its so much easier than having to either go online or print it out yourself. I like to make notes in the price guides, like which ones I have, conditions, prices paid, etc, even prices on ones for sale at dealers, so if I go to a local auction house, I have all that information together. I've done this with my other collectibles. At-least thats my thoughts.

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