Pressing paper money and the term EPQ
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8 posts in this topic

Can anyone here tell me how PMG knows if a note is pressed? Do they have a machine that can tell or are there tell-tale signs that inform the inspector if a note is pressed?

 

Correct me if I'm wrong here, EPQ means exceptional paper quality, and they put that on the label of un-pressed notes. If they discover a note that no longer has exceptional paper quality, then they will not put EPQ on the label.

 

It sounds like there is a definite way to tell if a note has been pressed.

 

I spend most of my time over in the CGC comic section chatting about comics and pressing is a very heated debate. CGC, which is owned by the same company that owns PMG states that they cannot detect if pressing has been done. How can PMG detect it yet CGC can not?

 

Any responses are much appreciated, whether it be from fellow collectors out there or from a representative of PMG.

 

Thanks! (thumbs u

 

Andy

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A few things to look for:

 

A pressed note will have a glossy sheen to it, especially on the portrait, when tilted to light.

 

The embossing created during the intaglio printing process will be gone or severely reduced on a pressed note.

 

A fold or bend which was pressed out will usually still appear when held to light.

 

Also, and this one comes with experience, the paper just does not feel right on a pressed note. The crispness has been muted and the paper gains a somewhat flimsy feel.

 

A pressed note is actually fairly easy to spot if you know what to look for and cannot grade EPQ. If you see a note graded EPQ by PMG, you can be confident it has not been messed with. Keep in mind that EPQ does not apply to lower-graded notes (I think the minimum grade is 30 for an EPQ designation).

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Thanks so much for your reply. It's a bit of a ghost town around here. I think the Canadian Paper Money Society's forum would be a better place to get more info on this subject. You have been a great help, though. Thanks again! (thumbs u

 

Andy

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Back in the day pressing and cleaning was fairly common by some dealers. It was not meant as a form of deception. It was widely accepted and the guys who did it on a regular basis were well known for it.

 

I agree with you Manning. Original common notes are the essence of collecting. When you hold an original hi grade note in your hand your senses come alive. Once you know what to look for it becomes obvious when a note has been worked on.

 

I would almost suggest that most of the early rare Fr.#'s have been worked on in one way or another no matter how minor. This is not always a bad thing. Conservation is sometimes necessary.

 

Evidence is readily available that at one point in time the federal goverment washed the money as it circulated through the federal reserve. I suspect some of the notes collected today show the effects of this process. To what degree I do not know.

 

If I were new to this hobby and were aware of what I know now......the first thing I would buy is the nicest Fr. 237 and use it as a benchmark to compare with other notes. The ink shimmer, paper quality and embossing can easily be had in one of these notes and afforded by most regardless of your budget.

 

Early original series notes are tough because the paper stock is very delicate and was improved quicky. By the mid 1878 or so the paper was pretty much fully evolved and continued to stay consistant through the 1923 series for the most part.

 

Silk fibers are easily noticed even in the most circulated notes. These were added to thwart would be counterfeiters and are still present in modern currency.

 

I hope this helps anyone coming into this fascinating hobby. Take your time and learn. Mistakes can be very expensive. It wont take long to catch on.

 

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I agree with Brian. Many collectors are unaware that early collectors of paper notes, especially large size, viewed embossing as an eyesore of types and purposely pressed the embossing out. Just as with coins, at one time, cleaning was accepted in the collecting community. The best way to learn if a note has PPQ or EPQ is to go to shows, handle as much paper money as you can. After a while it becomes second nature. Something I have seen a lot more of lately, are notes that have selective pressing. Meaning the doctor is careful to preserve the embossing around serial numbers and seals.I would advise handling notes as often as possible and it will become second nature. Also a nice small halogen flashlight can help pick up pressed out folds and is an essential tool to have with you at any show.

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