Luckyjeff

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Everything posted by Luckyjeff

  1. Thank you for the information. When discussing fancy notes on the PMG page, they labeled an Indian Rupee as a Super Solid 8. I got the impression mine would qualify as well. As for the mismatched serial number $20's, that was probably a more impressive find because one mismatched serial number would probably bring close to my solid 8 let alone several mismatched. However, I'll take my find....:) Mine was still a stroke of freakish luck because it is easier to spot a solid sequence than it is a series of mismatched bills before it gets to the ATM. Nobody I have ever heard of has grabbed a block like that out of an ATM. They got them elsewhere. The second best sequence that I have ever found was a semi- common block of star note $100's that were new but these were only worth about $110 to $120 each. I have a major currency fair coming up in August. I might sell some of the 7 of a kind there. At a minimum, I will be curious to see who sells fancy notes and what they have. I might trade for some other fancy notes. The ATM I used had an entire 1,000 bill stack that I caught at about 88888824 going UP, whereas some of the 100 bill blocks counted backwards. That was odd. I missed all of the 88888900 block. After that 1,000 bill block ended, the ATM had some of the next 1,000 bill block, about 150 bills, of the 88891000 series counting backwards but it abruptly stopped which was weird. I wonder if someone caught it and pulled the rest of the new notes. I was hoping to get into the block that had 88889999. The best I got out of the second group was 88890888 which is not very impressive.
  2. Thank you very much. They were new out of the ATM but, unfortunately, the solid 8's is not centered as well as the surrounding bills. I think, technically, it qualifies as a Super 8's because it is solid AND can be flipped upside down and read the same way. I will pay the extra $5 to try to get it labeled as "Super". I will probably grade all 10 bills in sequence, 88888880-88888889 but I'm trying to decide about 88888866, 88888666, 88888777, 88888877, and the other 7 of a kind that are not 7, 8's in a row.
  3. Thank you, now I don't feel like I am as much of a dummy. It should be pretty simple, look on the front and the back and if the size of the numbers don't match as either .6mm or 1mm then its a mule. That extra plate number on the left side of the front throws a curve. It's there for a reason and it appears to regularly be a different size than the right side plate number. That left plate number, being the same for consecutive notes, suggests that is is sheet sized plate and not a bill sized plate. It's odd that early notes just had a letter on the left side but the new bills have a letter AND a number on the left and right side of the bill.
  4. Thank you very much for showing me that chart but that shows the press letter and number in the upper right, not the one that is in the lower left. From what I can tell, it appears that the upper right number, next to the letter, varies even when bills are in sequence suggesting that individual plates are stacked together to print sheets, however, the lower left letter and number remain the same suggesting that printing a sheet of notes uses the same, one big plate for some part of the front of the note. The back of the note seems to operate the same as the front right serial number in that the number varies even with notes in sequence. From the discussion of mule notes, the implication is that there are only 2 plates used to print bills, one on the front and one on the back but the left serial number being, sometimes a different size than the right side, implies that 3 plates are used to print notes instead of just 2 plates. The left and right side letters appear to always be the same size, it is only the number that varies. Could you elaborate please. Also, I got the impression that micro, .6mm numbers, got replaced by macro 1mm numbers back in the 1920's and 1930's, however, my 2013 $1 bills have the smaller micro numbers .6mm on the front and the larger 1mm on the back. Are those plates REALLY OLD or are they randomly mixing micro and macro sized numbers still with notes? Thank you for your help.
  5. From what I have read concerning Mules, about every article differentiates between the size of the micro numbering between the front and the back of the note and whether it is .6mm or 1mm and also indicating that the microprinting was switched to the larger size 1mm. My problem is that there are TWO plate sets on the front and one on the back. On my 20's, the left side of the front has the number next to "E" as a .6mm and on the right side, the number next to the letter is 1mm. How do I compare the back with the front when the plate on the front has a micro number on the left side that is smaller than the micro number on the right side??? Also, I got the impression that .6mm micro plate numbers were phased out in the newer bills which is fine but my 2013 One dollar bills have .6mm Plate stamp numbers on the right side of the bill. That is two different sets of 2013 with two different Federal Reserve branches: San Francisco and Philadelphia. The left side plate stamp on the one's are the larger 1mm that matches the 1mm on the back. In summary, I have $1, 2013 bills with .6mm on the right front, 1mm on the left front and 1mm on the rear AND $20 bills from 2017 with .6mm on the left front, 1mm on the right front, and 1mm on the rear. ALSO, I have 2013, $20 bills with .6mm on the left front, .6mm on the right front and .6mm on the back. WHAT'S UP??? Have the .6mm numbers been phased out or not? Do I compare the right side plate number ONLY to the back and ignore the left side plate number? It doesn't look like the right front plate number and left front plate number match in size very often. Thank you for any feedback
  6. From what I have read concerning Mules, about every article differentiates between the size of the micro numbering between the front and the back of the note and whether it is .6mm or 1mm and also indicating that the microprinting was switched to the larger size 1mm. My problem is that there are TWO plate sets on the front and one on the back. On my 20's, the left side of the front has the number next to "E" as a .6mm and on the right side, the number next to the letter is 1mm. How do I compare the back with the front when the plate on the front has a micro number on the left side that is smaller than the micro number on the right side??? Also, I got the impression that .6mm micro plate numbers were phased out in the newer bills which is fine but my 2013 One dollar bills have .6mm Plate stamp numbers on the right side of the bill. That is two different sets of 2013 with two different Federal Reserve branches: San Francisco and Philadelphia. The left side plate stamp on the one's are the larger 1mm that matches the 1mm on the back. In summary, I have $1, 2013 bills with .6mm on the right front, 1mm on the left front and 1mm on the rear AND $20 bills from 2017 with .6mm on the left front, 1mm on the right front, and 1mm on the rear. ALSO, I have 2013, $20 bills with .6mm on the left front, .6mm on the right front and .6mm on the back. WHAT'S UP??? Thank you for any feedback
  7. It would be more valuable to an Asian because lots of 6's represents LUCK. 4 represents death but the prevalence of 6's would probably outweigh that. The condition is OK. Probably not much money but over face value. If a friend sells it on EBAY for you then use the title "Fancy, near solid, lucky 6's Bookend note".
  8. This would blow you away but I came across a 1,000 block of bills with 8's at an ATM machine. My final haul: 10 bills with 7, 8's in a row 88888880-88888889 including all 8's. 10 bills with 7, 8's. 43 bills with 6, 8's in a row. At least 100 plus bills with 6, 8's through the bills. 25 bills that are binaries even though not TRUE binaries of 0's and 1's, and some other interesting combinations. If curious, put in the search on the forum "Solid Fancy" in the newbie questions forum. I'm trying to figure out what to do with them. I collect currency enough to know I had something special but not until I got the first wave of bills. I deposited either 5 or 10 of the bills with 6, 8's in a row including one that had 7, 8's. At least I have the solid 8's.
  9. I'm confused! Is the problem that the seller removed the bill from the sealed PMG holder and didn't disclose this on the Ebay auction? Is it that the seller on Ebay removed it from the case and claimed the grade higher than PMG's grade? If the later then the buyer may have felt the bill was under graded by PMG. Ideally, if someone feels the bill is under graded by PMG, they should make a note of that. My concern would be if the person counterfeited the note and still has the graded sealed note. If they really felt that it was improperly graded, they should have removed it and sent it to the other grading house.
  10. I am NOT an expert but I can tell you that supply and demand determines value. The catalog reads X price for a bill but the key is condition. For whatever reason, the particular bill style is "hot". For example, I just got some bills with a large number of 8's and a solid 88888888. Technically there should be no difference between 77777777, 44444444, and 88888888 but all 8's command a premium because the number 8 is very lucky in Asian culture close to meaning "wealth" so people who collect currency like the solid numbers but ALSO Asians who are number superstitious who would only buy a few lucky bills. Dealers have a pretty good feel for bill values so if they are selling a bill for $2, they probably paid $1 or less. You'd be better off trying to buy bills from estate sales or stumbling on them or trading with someone who values that particular bill that you have more than you for one that person has that you value more than they do. Currency collecting is aging so in 10 years there may be fewer collectors.
  11. Depends upon many factors like the estimated value of the note, how fast you want it back, etc. Look at PMG website using search "submit bills for grading" There is the grading, insurance cost, shipping back to you, etc. Better to send multiple bills at once for efficiency.
  12. It is considered a binary but not a TRUE binary of just 0's and 1's. The odds of getting a note like this are about 1 in 9,000 but the condition is not very good. Fun to keep and use for liars poker or just because it is cool. I wouldn't spend it.
  13. The hot thing to do when these bills first came out was to get them stamped to show first day. The ink is shifted, not properly centered so that may make it interesting. The seal is not centered in the TWO. I don't get the impression these are particularly rare but they are cool.
  14. If you can't return it then it is irrelevant. It is a cool bill because of age so it isn't a bad deal and it is a very high number but not high enough to be really special. I suppose the fact that it is a trinary (not usually a big deal), high number but not high enough (not usually a big deal) on that bill (not usually a big deal because plenty available). However, the combo of all three will raise the value. I'd keep it.
  15. I believe they call that a repeater or quad repeater. They are nice bills but I don't think they command much of a premium in that condition. Best advice is if a good coin and paper money show is near by and just go there asking the vendors if they have any FANCY notes. Vendors who have several will be more likely to buy it since they know what they are worth. Look on Youtube and search "FANCY NOTES" to see videos of people who discuss valuation. PMG will actually grade the note and put "Repeater" on it but it may not be worth the money to grade it.
  16. That was a really cool article. Thank you for sharing. I also read about "Mule" designation and the star designation.
  17. That is a fun find. My version of this that I got out of the ATM is 54700547. I don't think they are worth very much but a fun find anyway. In my opinion, most of collecting is about things you like and when they are worth a lot then it is a bonus.
  18. Thank you Gnat! This brought up an interesting question for me. The mathematical odds of getting a solid number is 11,000,000 to 12,000,000 to one depending upon whether 99999999 is considered since newer series only go to 96,000,000. This is the theoretical odds but I keep hearing that people pay banks for bricks of notes so I wonder what the practical odds are of bills like this making it into an ATM machine? Is it still the same probability of an average Joe like me finding one or are the odds longer because series like these get intercepted before they make it to individual banks.
  19. Very tempted to keep the 88888888 because I could never afford to buy a bill like that or a similar rare note. If I grade it with PMG, it will qualify as a Super Fancy because it is solid 8's and is a rotator as well. If I keep it, I will grade it but the unfortunate thing about that particular bill is that it is not as perfectly centered as its surrounding bills so it will not grade REAL high. Probably mid 60's. I am going to a currency fair in North Georgia in August so I will see how similar bills are priced there. It was really interesting looking at the Stacks Bowers completed auctions for the US and Hong Kong. Solids and similar fancy notes have been really popular in Hong Kong but not as much here. Unfortunately, I didn't see ANY US currency auctioned in the Hong Kong market so I wonder about that. Anyway, thank you for your feedback. I really appreciate it very much.
  20. Thank you very much Fenntucky Mike! One thing I have learned with age is appreciating how much I DON'T know so I value advice more than when I was young. Very good thoughts. One thing about the Stacks Bowers free grading is that they will grade bills that they feel will benefit from grading, not every submission. However, as you indicated, they want to maximize the returns for their pocketbooks and reputation so if they thing the bill or coin will benefit then they will definitely pay for the grading. In my perfect world, I make enough on the bills to justify keeping 88888880-88888889 because the set is so hard to keep but I'm pretty certain that Stacks Bowers will require the surrender of that set to run the auction. They indicated that the collection needs to be valued at over $10,000 for them to do the deal with grading and I don't think that I have enough other special bills to successfully reach that level without throwing in the 10 best.
  21. I hit the MOTHERLOAD of luck! I was at my ATM and I like brand new notes so I pay more attention to them. By some weird freak, they had the 1,000 block starting with 88888. At first, I had no idea that solid notes command such a premium. I just wanted the 88888888 because I thought the bill was cool. I do collect coins and notes but I'm not real serious so I go to coin shows to buy a few things that I like in my price range. Anyway, I knew enough about currency to look up the values and I nearly had a heart attack especially since lots of 8's are highly valued in many Asian cultures. At first, I took about 5 to 10 of the notes starting with 888888 and deposited them into another account....:( After I realized what I had, I started withdrawing the notes to my withdraw limit which I thought was just $500 so I missed sections of notes. At the end, I was withdrawing my max limit on this bankcard and my other bank accounts cards there too, absorbing the ATM fee for non-member banks until the notes ran out. These are the best of the notes for both collectors or Asians. Numerology in Chinese can be difficult in combos. 8 and 6 are obviously good and 4 is obviously bad yet 54 is pretty good and 848 represents "Wealth for 8 lifetimes" even though 4 represents "death". I am trying to figure out which notes to grade and which ones not to grade. Obviously, 88888888 should be graded but I'd think ALL the notes from 88888880 to 88888889 should be graded. A few of these are near double quads like 88888777 and 88888666 and then there is a note like 88888168 which tends to mean "Easy wealth all the way" Apparently, I can only upload some of the bills so I picked a variety. I have binaries and near double quads as well as 6 8's followed by numbers like 44 or 55 or 77. Besides deciding which bills to grade, I am trying to figure out how to reach out to the Asian community to sell the notes that would be less interesting to currency collectors like 88888237 which is a bill with the lucky numbers for horse, one of the 12 Chinese Zodiac animals and 88888168 which means "Easy wealth all the way" One of the bills is 88888765. Is this called a "Solid ladder"? Is this bill especially desirable? Thank you for any help
  22. I just looked at the packing instructions. It indicates that you should pack in a non pvc, mylar sleeve. The bills above are encased in hard plastic, snap together shells. Are they OK to use when shipping? I'd prefer to limit touching as much as possible. I do have the rigid plastic sleeves but would prefer the bills be more protected in those shells even if I couldn't get them back. The other question is why the sleeves must be non-pvc. Why is a PVC sleeve a problem? Thank you for your help.
  23. That was VERY helpful Jennifer. THANK YOU!
  24. From that series that you see above, I have several hundred bills, all starting with 88888 with various combinations like 88888237 (Lucky numbers for Horse as well as the other Chinese Zodiac lucky numbers), about 45 bills that start with 888888 including 88888880-88888889. Where I struggle is with the meaning of combinations of numbers. I've read that 4 means death but if the number is 848 then it implies wealth for 8 lifetimes. 74 might mean "Death for certain" but 78 might mean "Wealth for certain". I have a very big Asian community where I live, maybe second only to San Francisco and New York but figuring out WHO to contact is the challenge. BTW, I am assuming you took those notes during COVID to keep safe.....hahaha. The big thing about US notes vs. other countries is that we have 8 digits in our notes which means that it is roughly 1 in 96,000,000 chance of landing solid 8's vs. some countries currencies that only have 6 digits meaning that solid 8's occur as 1 in 999,999 which is a LOT more frequent. I've contacted Stacks Bowers about auctioning off my bills but I have a pretty good feeling that they'd struggle with good Asian combinations. I searched for license plate numbers that auction off at a high price to get some idea of what other good number combinations to look for in my notes. I have several from the 200's like 88888268 and 88888222 as well as 88888226. Another big challenge is figuring out WHICH notes to professionally grade. I think the complete 10 note set 88888880-88888889 should be graded as well as the number above 88888666 but then it gets a bit tricky because grading isn't cheap.
  25. I haven't decided whether to be a member of PMG or ANA, which provides submission privileges through PMG. I might do both. I've seen your post but it doesn't explain how to package the notes for safe transport to you, and the pricing indicates a range depending upon the value of the note. Is that value determined by you? If it is supposed to be determined by me, there is NO chance. I don't know enough about bills to value them. Some of these notes I will sell and some I will keep. Ideally, I make enough money on the lesser bills to keep the 88888880-88888889 set because of its hard to find feature. I do have a serious error note and some sub 1917 notes I have considered grading as well. I REALLY WISH there was a video showing how one packages bills for submission. Doing it the first time is so stressful that I considered waiting for the Fun convention in Orlando to submit them to a representative in person. I got a submission packet from the last convention that I attended but I misplaced it somewhere. All I remember is that it seemed a bit daunting for some reason.