Luckyjeff

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  1. Thank you for the information. When discussing fancy notes on the PMG page, they labeled an Indian Rupee as a Super Solid 8. I got the impression mine would qualify as well. As for the mismatched serial number $20's, that was probably a more impressive find because one mismatched serial number would probably bring close to my solid 8 let alone several mismatched. However, I'll take my find....:) Mine was still a stroke of freakish luck because it is easier to spot a solid sequence than it is a series of mismatched bills before it gets to the ATM. Nobody I have ever heard of has grabbed a
  2. Thank you very much. They were new out of the ATM but, unfortunately, the solid 8's is not centered as well as the surrounding bills. I think, technically, it qualifies as a Super 8's because it is solid AND can be flipped upside down and read the same way. I will pay the extra $5 to try to get it labeled as "Super". I will probably grade all 10 bills in sequence, 88888880-88888889 but I'm trying to decide about 88888866, 88888666, 88888777, 88888877, and the other 7 of a kind that are not 7, 8's in a row.
  3. Thank you, now I don't feel like I am as much of a dummy. It should be pretty simple, look on the front and the back and if the size of the numbers don't match as either .6mm or 1mm then its a mule. That extra plate number on the left side of the front throws a curve. It's there for a reason and it appears to regularly be a different size than the right side plate number. That left plate number, being the same for consecutive notes, suggests that is is sheet sized plate and not a bill sized plate. It's odd that early notes just had a letter on the left side but the new bills have a letter
  4. Thank you very much for showing me that chart but that shows the press letter and number in the upper right, not the one that is in the lower left. From what I can tell, it appears that the upper right number, next to the letter, varies even when bills are in sequence suggesting that individual plates are stacked together to print sheets, however, the lower left letter and number remain the same suggesting that printing a sheet of notes uses the same, one big plate for some part of the front of the note. The back of the note seems to operate the same as the front right serial number in that
  5. From what I have read concerning Mules, about every article differentiates between the size of the micro numbering between the front and the back of the note and whether it is .6mm or 1mm and also indicating that the microprinting was switched to the larger size 1mm. My problem is that there are TWO plate sets on the front and one on the back. On my 20's, the left side of the front has the number next to "E" as a .6mm and on the right side, the number next to the letter is 1mm. How do I compare the back with the front when the plate on the front has a micro number on the left side that is s
  6. From what I have read concerning Mules, about every article differentiates between the size of the micro numbering between the front and the back of the note and whether it is .6mm or 1mm and also indicating that the microprinting was switched to the larger size 1mm. My problem is that there are TWO plate sets on the front and one on the back. On my 20's, the left side of the front has the number next to "E" as a .6mm and on the right side, the number next to the letter is 1mm. How do I compare the back with the front when the plate on the front has a micro number on the left side that is s
  7. It would be more valuable to an Asian because lots of 6's represents LUCK. 4 represents death but the prevalence of 6's would probably outweigh that. The condition is OK. Probably not much money but over face value. If a friend sells it on EBAY for you then use the title "Fancy, near solid, lucky 6's Bookend note".
  8. This would blow you away but I came across a 1,000 block of bills with 8's at an ATM machine. My final haul: 10 bills with 7, 8's in a row 88888880-88888889 including all 8's. 10 bills with 7, 8's. 43 bills with 6, 8's in a row. At least 100 plus bills with 6, 8's through the bills. 25 bills that are binaries even though not TRUE binaries of 0's and 1's, and some other interesting combinations. If curious, put in the search on the forum "Solid Fancy" in the newbie questions forum. I'm trying to figure out what to do with them. I collect currency enough to know I had something special b
  9. I'm confused! Is the problem that the seller removed the bill from the sealed PMG holder and didn't disclose this on the Ebay auction? Is it that the seller on Ebay removed it from the case and claimed the grade higher than PMG's grade? If the later then the buyer may have felt the bill was under graded by PMG. Ideally, if someone feels the bill is under graded by PMG, they should make a note of that. My concern would be if the person counterfeited the note and still has the graded sealed note. If they really felt that it was improperly graded, they should have removed it and sent it to
  10. I am NOT an expert but I can tell you that supply and demand determines value. The catalog reads X price for a bill but the key is condition. For whatever reason, the particular bill style is "hot". For example, I just got some bills with a large number of 8's and a solid 88888888. Technically there should be no difference between 77777777, 44444444, and 88888888 but all 8's command a premium because the number 8 is very lucky in Asian culture close to meaning "wealth" so people who collect currency like the solid numbers but ALSO Asians who are number superstitious who would only buy a fe
  11. Depends upon many factors like the estimated value of the note, how fast you want it back, etc. Look at PMG website using search "submit bills for grading" There is the grading, insurance cost, shipping back to you, etc. Better to send multiple bills at once for efficiency.
  12. It is considered a binary but not a TRUE binary of just 0's and 1's. The odds of getting a note like this are about 1 in 9,000 but the condition is not very good. Fun to keep and use for liars poker or just because it is cool. I wouldn't spend it.
  13. The hot thing to do when these bills first came out was to get them stamped to show first day. The ink is shifted, not properly centered so that may make it interesting. The seal is not centered in the TWO. I don't get the impression these are particularly rare but they are cool.
  14. If you can't return it then it is irrelevant. It is a cool bill because of age so it isn't a bad deal and it is a very high number but not high enough to be really special. I suppose the fact that it is a trinary (not usually a big deal), high number but not high enough (not usually a big deal) on that bill (not usually a big deal because plenty available). However, the combo of all three will raise the value. I'd keep it.
  15. I believe they call that a repeater or quad repeater. They are nice bills but I don't think they command much of a premium in that condition. Best advice is if a good coin and paper money show is near by and just go there asking the vendors if they have any FANCY notes. Vendors who have several will be more likely to buy it since they know what they are worth. Look on Youtube and search "FANCY NOTES" to see videos of people who discuss valuation. PMG will actually grade the note and put "Repeater" on it but it may not be worth the money to grade it.